Exhibition

Current Exhibition

Ainu Woodcarver Fujito Takeki: Envoy of the Forest

Ainu Woodcarver Fujito Takeki:
Envoy of the Forest

Saturday, July 17 - Sunday, September 26, 2021

Tickets can be purchased from Lawson Ticket

Carrying on the woodcarving tradition of his Ainu forebears, Fujito Takeki (1934–2018) broke new ground in works renowned for their raw realism and fine detail. Born to Ainu parents in Bihoro, Hokkaido, Fujito began carving wood as a young boy under the tutelage of his father, a bear carver by trade. At the age of 30, the junior Fujito established his own shop and studio in the Hokkaido hot-spring town of Akanko, at Lake Akan. Taking not only bears but also wolves, deer, owls, and his own ancestors as his subjects, he sculpted works that brim with life, depicting some larger drama in one telltale moment. Fujito’s animals appear in stop-action scenes as predator, prey, and parents raising their young; his fellow Ainu exude vitality in both life-sized statues as well as tabletop carvings depicting their customs and ways. This exhibition, the first to introduce Fujito’s art in Tokyo, presents more than 80 works tracing the full arc of his remarkable career.

Next Exhibition

Kobayakawa Shusei: A Life of Journey and Requiem

Kobayakawa Shusei:
A Life of Journey and Requiem

Saturday, October 9 - Sunday, November 28, 2021

Tickets can be purchased from Lawson Ticket

Kobayakawa Shusei (1885-1974) is a Kyoto-based Nihonga artist who was active in the Taisho and Showa periods. Shusei, the eldest son of the head priest of Kotokuji Temple in Tottori, at the age of nine, began training as a Buddhist priest at Higashi Honganji Temple. He later decided to become a painter and studied under the Nihonga artists Taniguchi Kokyo and Yamamoto Shunkyo. As he honed his skills, he was selected a number of times to display his works at the Bunten and Teiten exhibitions. Shusei liked to travel, and visited European countries and Asia. He later went into the front time and again as an official war artist, and produced many war paintings; one particularly striking example is Shield of the Nation, which is considered to be his masterpiece. This is the first large-scale retrospective exhibition to give an overview of Kobayakawa Shusei’s oeuvre. Over 100 of his works are on display, ranging over his early historical paintings, war paintings that are being displayed for the first time, and the Buddhist paintings of his later years.